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akc belgian tervuren


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eddie williams - cincinnati, Ohio  U.S.A. - 678.429.9301
Email: eddie@myterv.com

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akc breeder of merit

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Breed standards

 

AKC

General Appearance
The first impression of the Belgian Tervuren is that of a well-balanced, medium-size dog, elegant in appearance, standing squarely on all fours, with proud carriage of head and neck. He is strong, agile, well-muscled, alert and full of life. He gives the impression of depth and solidity without bulkiness. The male should appear unquestionably masculine; the female should have a distinctly feminine look and be judged equally with the male. The Belgian Tervuren is a natural dog and there is no need for excessive posing in the show ring. The Belgian Tervuren reflects the qualities of intelligence, courage, alertness and devotion to master. In addition to his inherent ability as a herding dog, he protects his master's person and property without being overtly aggressive. He is watchful, attentive, and usually in motion when not under command. The Belgian Tervuren is a herding dog and versatile worker. The highest value is to be placed on qualities that maintain these abilities, specifically, correct temperament, gait, bite and coat.

Size, Proportion, Substance
The ideal male is 24 to 26 inches in height and female 22 to 24 inches in height measured at the withers. Dogs are to be penalized in accordance to the degree they deviate from the ideal. Males under 23 inches or over 26½ inches or females under 21 inches or over 24½ inches are to be disqualified. The body is square; the length measured from the point of shoulder to the point of the rump approximates the height. Females may be somewhat longer in body. Bone structure is medium in proportion to height, so that he is well-balanced throughout and neither spindly or leggy nor cumbersome and bulky. Head - Well-chiseled, skin taut, long without exaggeration. Expression intelligent and questioning, indicating alertness, attention and readiness for action. Eyes dark brown, medium-size, slightly almond shape, not protruding. Light, yellow or round eyes are a fault. Ears triangular in shape, well-cupped, stiff, erect; height equal to width at base. Set high, the base of the ear does not come below the center of the eye. Hanging ears, as on a hound, are a disqualification. Skull and muzzle measuring from the stop are of equal length. Overall size is in proportion to the body, top of skull flattened rather than rounded, the width approximately the same as, but not wider than the length. Stop moderate. The topline of the muzzle is parallel to the topline of the skull when viewed from the side. Muzzle moderately pointed, avoiding any tendency toward snipiness or cheekiness. Jaws strong and powerful. Nose black without spots or discolored areas. Nostrils well defined. Lips tight and black, no pink showing on the outside when mouth is closed. Teeth Full complement of strong white teeth, evenly set, meeting in a scissors or a level bite. Overshot and undershot teeth are a fault. An undershot bite such that there is a complete loss of contact by all the incisors is a disqualification. Broken or discolored teeth should not be penalized. Missing teeth are a fault. Four or more missing teeth are a serious fault.

Neck, Topline, Body
Neck round, muscular, rather long and elegant, slightly arched and tapered from head to body. Skin well-fitting with no loose folds. Withers accentuated. Topline level, straight and firm from withers to croup. Croup medium long, sloping gradually to the base of the tail. Chest not broad without being narrow, but deep; the lowest point of the brisket reaching the elbow, forming a smooth ascendant curve to the abdomen. Abdomen moderately developed, neither tucked up nor paunchy. Ribs well-sprung but flat on the sides. Loin section viewed from above is relatively short, broad and strong, but blending smoothly into the back. Tail strong at the base, the last vertebra to reach at least to the hock. At rest the dog holds it low, the tip bent back level with the hock. When in action, he may raise it to a point level with the topline giving it a slight curve, but not a hook. Tail is not carried above the backline nor turned to one side. A cropped or stump tail is a disqualification.

Forequarters
Shoulders long, laid back 45 degrees, flat against the body, forming a right angle with the upper arm. Top of the shoulder blades roughly two thumbs width apart. Upper arms should move in a direction exactly parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body. Forearms long and well-muscled. Legs straight and parallel, perpendicular to the ground. Bone oval rather than round. Pasterns short and strong, slightly sloped. Dewclaws may be removed. Feet rounded, cat footed, turning neither in nor out, toes curved close together, well-padded, strong nails.

Hindquarters
Legs powerful without heaviness, moving in the same pattern as the limbs of the forequarters. Bone oval rather than round. Thighs broad and heavily muscled. Stifles clearly defined, with upper shank at right angles to hip bones. Hocks moderately bent. Metatarsi short, perpendicular to the ground, parallel to each other when viewed from the rear. Dewclaws are removed. Feet slightly elongated, toes curved close together, heavily padded, strong nails.

Coat
The Belgian Tervuren is particularly adaptable to extremes of temperature or climate. The guard hairs of the coat must be long, close-fitting, straight and abundant. The texture is of medium harshness, not silky or wiry. Wavy or curly hair is a fault. The undercoat is very dense, commensurate, however, with climatic conditions. The hair is short on the head, outside the ears, and on the front part of the legs. The opening of the ear is protected by tufts of hair. Ornamentation consists of especially long and abundant hair, like a collarette around the neck, particularly on males; fringe of long hair down the back of the forearm; especially long and abundant hair trimming the breeches; long, heavy and abundant hair on the tail. The female rarely has as long or as ornamented a coat as the male. This disparity must not be a consideration when the female is judged against the male.

Color
Body rich fawn to russet mahogany with black overlay is ideal and preferred. Predominate color that is pale, washed out, cream or gray is a fault. The coat is characteristically double pigmented whereby the tips of fawn hairs are blackened. Belgian Tervuren characteristically become darker with age. On mature males, this blackening is especially pronounced on the shoulders, back and rib section. Blackening in patches is a fault. Although allowance should be made for females and young males, absence of blackening in mature dogs is a serious fault. Chest is normally black, but may be a mixture of black and gray. White is permitted on the chest/sternum only, not to extend more than 3 inches above the prosternum, and not to reach either point of shoulder. Face has a black mask and the ears are mostly black. A face with a complete absence of black is a serious fault. Frost or white on chin or muzzle is normal. The underparts of the body, tail, and breeches are cream, gray, or light beige. The tail typically has a darker or black tip. Feet - The tips of the toes may be white. Nail color may vary from black to transparent. Solid black, solid liver or any area of white except as specified on the chest, tips of the toes, chin and muzzle are disqualifications.

Gait
Lively and graceful, covering the maximum ground with minimum effort. Always in motion, seemingly never tiring, he shows ease of movement rather than hard driving action. He single tracks at a fast gait, the legs both front and rear converging toward the centerline of gravity of the dog. Viewed from the side he exhibits full extension of both fore and hindquarters. The backline should remain firm and level, parallel to the line of motion. His natural tendency is to move in a circle, rather than a straight line. Padding, hackneying, weaving, crabbing and similar movement faults are to be penalized according to the degree with which they interfere with the ability of the dog to work.

Temperament
In his relationship with humans he is observant and vigilant with strangers, but not apprehensive. He does not show fear or shyness. He does not show viciousness by unwarranted or unprovoked attack. He must be approachable, standing his ground and showing confidence to meet overtures without himself making them. With those he knows well, he is most affectionate and friendly, zealous for their attention and very possessive.

Faults: Any deviation from these specifications is a fault. In determining whether a fault is minor, serious, or major, these two factors should be used as a guide:

The extent to which it deviates from the standard.
The extent to which such deviation would actually affect the working ability of the dog.

Disqualifications
Males under 23 inches or over 26½ inches or females under 21 inches or over 24½ inches.
Hanging ears, as on a hound.
An undershot bite such that there is a complete loss of contact by all the incisors.
A cropped or stump tail.
Solid black, solid liver or any area of white except as specified on the chest, tips of the toes, chin, and muzzle.

Approved January 9, 2007
Effective March 1, 2007

UKC

HISTORY

On September 29, 1891, the "Club due Chien de Berger Belge" (Belgian Shepherd Dog Club) was organized to determine the characteristics of the native shepherd dogs in Belgium. They defined a consistent type of native dog, anatomically identical but differing in hair texture, hair length and colors.

During the first decade of the twentieth century, owners and breeders in Belgium urged acceptance of additional Varieties based on color and the adoption of "place names" to designate those Varieties. The black, long-hairs were given the name Groenendael. The fawn, rough-hairs were given the name Laekenois. The short-haired fawn with black mask and charcoaling was given the name Malinois. The name Tervueren was given to the long-haired fawn with black mask and charcoaling. "Tervueren" later became the designation for the long-hair other than black.

His abilities as an intelligent and versatile working dog soon gained him popularity in other countries as well. The first Belgian Shepherd Dogs were imported into the United States in the early 1900's. Although earlier identified as three separate breeds, when UKC registered the Belgian Shepherd Dog in 1991, they were once again united as a single breed with four distinct varieties.

GENERAL APPEARANCE

The Belgian Shepherd Dog is an elegant, well-proportioned, medium-sized, square dog. By his majestic carriage and harmony of form, the dog of the Belgian Sheepherders gives the impression of elegant robustness. He is a hardy individual, accustomed to living in the open air and built to resist inclement weather and the atmospheric changes so frequent in the Belgian climate. His elegance and expression denote great strength of character, making him a proud representative of the herding breeds.

Disqualifications: Unilateral or bilateral or cryptorchid.

CHARACTERISTICS

The Belgian Shepherd Dog was developed in Belgium as a herding dog to work sheep. He is enthusiastic and remarkably quick. He shows a natural tendency to be in motion. The Belgian was developed for endurance. He must be able to move and tend the flock all day and to guard it from all invaders. In addition to his inborn ability as guardian of the flocks, he is an exceptional watchdog and a tenacious and brave defender of his master and family. He is vigilant, and highly responsive to his owner's direction. He is alert, intelligent and inquisitive. While he is firmly loyal to those he knows and loves, he typically exhibits reserve with strangers.

Disqualifications: Viciousness or extreme shyness.

HEAD

The head is finely chiseled, long without exaggeration, and lean. The skull and muzzle are approximately the same length with, at most, a very slight advantage for the muzzle; which gives the whole head a finished impression.

Fault: Too broad or too heavy a head; or a too pointed, foxy head.

SKULL - Medium width in proportion to the length of the head. The forehead is more flat than round. The occiput is not accentuated. Seen in profile, the upper line of the skull is parallel to an imaginary line drawn from the muzzle.

MUZZLE - Of approximately equal length to the length of the skull, narrowing gradually toward the nose. The upper line of the muzzle is straight; and seen in profile it is parallel to an imaginary line drawn from the skull. The mouth is well split. When the mouth is open, the corners are drawn well back and are in line with the eyes. The muzzle is well-chiseled under the eyes.

STOP - Moderate.

Fault: Excessive, or lack of, stop.

NOSE - Black, with well-opened nostrils.

Fault: Lack of external pigmentation.

LIPS - Thin in texture, well-tightened, strongly pigmented, not allowing the red of the mucous membranes to show when closed.

Fault: Lack of external pigmentation.

CHEEKS - Clean and flat, although very muscular.

EYES - Medium size, neither prominent nor deep set. Almond in shape, brown in color, preferably dark. Their look is direct, lively, intelligent and questioning. The eyelids are edged in black.

Fault: Very light or round eyes.

EARS - High set, triangular, carried well-pricked. The ears are small to medium and in proportion to the length of the head and the size of the dog. The concavity of the ear (concha) is well-curved at the base. The base of the ear does not come below an imaginary line drawn from the corner of the eye.

Disqualifications: Drooping or hanging ears.

DENTITION - Jaws are well-developed and furnished with forty-two strong, white teeth that meet in scissors bite. A level meeting of the incisors is acceptable. It is the so-called "pincer" bite which was preferred by the herdsmen.

Fault: Absence of premolar(s) or molar(s); the absence of one premolar (PMI) is not penalized.

Disqualifications: Undershot or overshot bite such that contact with two incisors is lost. (Note: loss of contact caused by short center incisors shall not be judged as undershot in an otherwise correct bite.)

NECK

The neck is distinct. The neck is slightly elongated and muscular, without throatiness, widening gradually towards the shoulders. The nape is very slightly arched.

FOREQUARTERS

The Belgian Shepherd Dog has a solid skeletal structure, lean with strong musculature.

SHOULDERS - The shoulder blades are long and sloping, securely and flatly attached, forming with the upper arm (humerus) an angle sufficient to insure the free movement of the elbows.

ARMS - The upper arms lie close to the body. They move in a direction parallel to the longitudinal (lengthwise) axis of the body. The dog single tracks as speed increases.

FOREARMS - Long and well-muscled.

PASTERNS (Metacarpal bones) - Short, strong and slightly sloping.

FORE FEET - Round. The toes are curved and quite compact. The pads are dense and elastic. The nails are dark and strong.

BODY

The body is powerful without heaviness. The length, measured from the point of the shoulder to the end of the rump (illium), is approximately equal to the height at the withers. In bitches, the length can go slightly beyond the height of the withers.

BREAST - Seen from the front, the breast is not too broad, without being narrow.

CHEST - Not too broad, but in compensation, deep and inclined. The thoracic cage is encircled by ribs which are arched in the upper part, but flat on the sides.

WITHERS - Accentuated.

BACK AND LOINS - The back and lumbar/loin region are straight, broad and powerfully muscled and short.

CROUP - Very slightly sloped. Broad without exaggeration.

ABDOMEN - Moderately developed, neither hanging (paunchy) nor tucked up. It prolongs, in a harmonious curve, the line under the chest.

HINDQUARTERS

Powerful without heaviness. The legs are perpendicular to the ground, moving in the same plane as the forequarters. The dog single tracks as speed increases.

THIGHS - Broad and well-muscled.

STIFLE - Long, broad, well-muscled and moderately angulated, without exaggeration.

HOCKS - The hocks should be short, broad and muscled. Seen from the rear, they will be perfectly parallel (to each other).

REAR PASTERNS (Metatarsal Bones) - Solid and short. Removal of rear dewclaws is preferred but not mandatory.

HIND FEET - Slightly oval, with the toes curved and very compact. Dense and elastic pads. The nails are black and strong.

TAIL - The tail is well set and of medium length, extending to the hocks. When at ease, the dog carries it at the level of the hock, with the tip slightly curved toward the rear. When in action, the dog raises it higher and accentuates the curve towards the tip, without at any time forming a hook or a deviation. (The tail is held without deviating from the center line.)

Fault: Tail carried too high, hooked or carried outside the median line.

Disqualifications: Absence of or docked tail.

SIZE

The desirable size for males is 23" - 26½".

The desirable size for females is 21" - 24½".

Eliminating Faults: Males under 23" or over 26½". Females under 21" or over 24½".

GAIT

The gait is ground-covering, effortless and seemingly tireless. The Belgian Shepherd Dog is usually in motion and is capable of working livestock all day. Because he was developed as a herding dog, and because of his exuberant temperament, he tends to move in circles around his owner rather than in a straight line.

COAT

The hair should be rich and dense, giving good protection against wet and cold. The undercoat is very dense, corresponding with climatic conditions. Since the length, direction and appearance of the hair is different in the dogs of the Belgian Shepherd Dog breed, this point was adopted as a criterion for distinguishing the breed's Varieties. In all the Varieties, the hair must always be abundant, dense and of good texture, forming with the wooly undercoat an excellent protective covering.

Long Hair (Groenendael and Tervueren) - The hair is short on the head, the exterior face of the ears, and the lower part of the legs, except on the back of the forelegs, from the elbows to the pasterns, which are garnished by long hairs called feathering. The hair is long and straight over the rest of the body and longer and more abundant around the neck and on the breast, where it forms a collarette and frill. The opening of the ear is protected by tufted hairs. The hair from the base of the ear is raised back and frames the head. The thighs are covered with very long and abundant hair, which forms culottes. The tall is garnished with abundant hair, forming a plume.

Faults: Wavy hair. Lack of sufficient undercoat to form a double coat.

Short Hair (Malinois) - The hair should be short on the head, the exterior of the ears and the lower parts of the legs. Short on the rest of the body, thicker on the tail and around the neck, where it forms a slight collarette beginning at the base of the ear and extending to the throat. In addition, the hindquarters should be fringed with longer hair. The coat should be thick, close and of good firm texture with a woolly undercoat. The coat should conform to the body without standing out or hanging down. The distribution of hair on the tail simulates an ear of wheat.

Fault: Lack of sufficient undercoat to form a double coat. Wavy hair. Too long hair.

Rough Hair (Laekenois) - The hair is rough and of a harsh state, which further appears disorderly. The length of the hair is noticeably the same on all parts of the body. The length is approximately two-and-a-half inches (six centimeters). The hair around the eyes and the hair garnishing the muzzle is not excessive. The existence of a hard, rough beard and moustache on the muzzle are mandatory. The tail does not form a plume.

Faults: Silky or soft hair. Lack of sufficient undercoat to form a double coat.

COLORS

 

Groenendael - The Groenendael is the long-haired black. The Groenendael may be all black, or may be black with a small to moderate white patch on the chest, and the tips of the toes may be white. White or gray frosting on the muzzle is acceptable.

Fault: Dominant red tinge.

 

Tervueren - The Tervueren is the charcoaled, "long-haired, other than black" with dark mask. A small to moderate white patch is permitted on the chest, and the tips of the toes may be white. White or gray frosting on the muzzle is acceptable.

Body - Fawn and Sable (all the gamut of colors through beige to gray), with charcoaling. The coat is characteristically double pigmented, wherein the tip of each hair is blackened. On mature males, this darkening is especially pronounced on the shoulders, back and rib section. The under parts of the body, tail and coulottes are cream, gray or light beige. The coat characteristically becomes darker with increasing age. Allowance should be made for females and young males. The tail typically has a darker tip.

Faults: Lack of charcoaling at maturity. Excessive charcoaling, tending to a black saddle, black in patches.

Face - The face has a black mask. The preferred mask is well pronounced, stretching to unite the upper and lower lips, the corners of the mouth, and the eyelids, in a single dark zone. The ears are mostly dark. An open mask or mostly black head is acceptable.

Faults: Minimal mask.

 

Malinois - The Malinois is the short-haired, charcoal, other than black, with a dark mask. The small to moderate white patch is permitted on the chest, and the tips of the toes may be white. White or gray frosting on the muzzle is acceptable.

Body - Fawn and Sable (all the gamut of colors through beige to gray), with charcoaling. The coat is characteristically double pigmented, wherein the tip of each hair is blackened. On mature males this darkening is especially pronounced on the shoulders, back and rib section. The under parts of the body, tail and coulottes are cream gray or light beige. The coat characteristically becomes darker with increasing age. Allowance should be made for female and young males. The tail typically has darker tip.

Faults: Lack of charcoaling at maturity. Excessive charcoaling tending to a black saddle, black in patches.

Face - The face has a black mask. The preferred mask is well pronounced, stretching to unite the upper and lower lips, the corners of the mouth, and the eyelids in a single dark zone. The ears are mostly dark. An open mask or mostly black head is acceptable.

Faults: Minimal mask.

Laekenois - The Laekenois is the rough-haired other than black, with traces of charcoaling, principally on the muzzle and tail. A small to moderate white patch is permitted on the chest, and the tips of the toes may be white. White or gray frosting on the muzzle is acceptable.

Body - Fawn and Sable (all the gamut of colors through beige to gray), with charcoaling. The coat is characteristically double pigmented, wherein the tip of each hair is blackened. On mature males, this blackening is especially pronounced on the shoulders, back and rib section. The under parts of the body, tail and coulottes are cream, gray or light beige. The coat characteristically becomes darker with increasing age. Allowance should be made for females and young males. The tail typically has a darker tip.

Disqualifications: All varieties. Albinism. Solid white markings elsewhere than on tips of toes, chest, or frosting on muzzle. In Tervueren and Malinois, the absence of black on one or more of the following points: ear bases, eyebrows, sides of muzzle and underjaw.

FAULTS

Bitch type of dog; dog type of bitch.

The Belgian Shepherd Dog is a herding dog, and faults that affect his ability to work livestock in all types of climatic changes should be particularly penalized.

ELIMINATING FAULTS

(An Eliminating Fault is a Fault serious enough that it eliminates the dog from obtaining any awards in a conformation event.)

Males under 23" or over 26½". Females under 21" or over 24½".

DISQUALIFICATIONS

(A dog with a Disqualification must not be considered for placement in a conformation event, and must be reported to UKC.)

Unilateral or bilateral or cryptorchid.

Viciousness or extreme shyness.

Albinism.

Undershot or overshot bite such that contact with two incisors is lost. (Note: loss of contact caused by short center incisors shall not be judged as undershot in an otherwise correct bite.)

Drooping or hanging ears.

Solid white markings elsewhere than on tips of toes, chest, or frosting on muzzle.

Absence of or docked tail.

In Tervueren and Malinois, the absence of black on one or more of the following points: ear bases, eyebrows, sides of muzzle and underjaw.

Please Note: In UKC Conformation Shows, this breed is shown by variety in this order – Groenendael, Laekenois, Malinois, Tervueren.

CKC

Belgian Shepherd Dog

Origin and Purpose
The Belgian Shepherd Dog has an ancestry which is common to many of the herding dogs used throughout the modern world. His type is a result of the rugged Belgian climate and the requirements of the Belgian shepherd for a bright, strong, and agile dog. In addition to sheep herding, the Belgian Shepherd Dog has been widely used for police and war work and is noted for his intelligence and alertness in obedience work.

General Appearance
The first impression of the Belgian Shepherd Dog should be that of a well-balanced square dog, elegant in appearance, with an exceedingly proud carriage of head and neck. He should be a strong, agile, well-muscled animal who is alert and full of life. His whole conformation should give the impression of depth and solidity without bulkiness. The dog should be somewhat more impressive and grand than the bitch. The bitch should have a distinctively feminine look.

Like many European breeds, different coat colours, textures, and lengths were preferred by the original fanciers. Today, however, only four distinct coat types are recognized and have become the distinguishing characteristics of the four varieties of Belgian Shepherd Dog. The long-haired Groenendael and Tervuren, the short-haired Malinois, and the rough-haired Laeken variety differ in coat colour, length and texture but are unmistakably the same breed.

Temperament
The Belgian Shepherd Dog should reflect the qualities of intelligence, courage, alertness, and devotion to his master. To his inherent aptitude as guardian of flocks should be added protectiveness of the person and property of his master. He should be watchful, attentive, and always in motion when not under command. In his relationship with humans, he should be observant and vigilant with strangers but not apprehensive. He should not show fear or shyness. He should not show viciousness by unwarranted or unprovoked attack. With those he knows well, he is most affectionate, friendly, zealous of their attention, and very possessive.

Size
Males should be 24-26 inches (61-66 cm) in height and females 22-24 inches (61-66 cm) measured at the withers. The length, measured from the front of the forechest to the rear projection of the pelvis, should equal the height. Bitches may be slightly longer. Bone structure should be moderately heavy in proportion to height so that he is well balanced throughout and neither spindly and leggy nor cumbersome and bulky.

Coat and Colour
Coat length, colour, and texture is the one distinguishing feature between the different varieties of the Belgian Shepherd Dog.
(a) Long-haired
The guard hairs of the coat must be long, well fitting, straight and abundant. The texture should be a medium harshness. The undercoat should be extremely dense, commensurate, however, with climatic conditions. The hair is shorter on the head, outside of the ears, and lower part of the legs. The opening of the ear is protected by tufts of hair. There should be long and abundant hair forming a collarette around the neck; forming a fringe along the back of the forearm; forming the breeches in the hindquarters and forming a nicely plumed tail. Two colour types are found in the long-haired variety:
(i) The dog should be completely black or be black with white limited as follows: small to moderate patch on forechest, between the pads of the feet, on tips of hind toes, and frost on the chin and muzzle. White on the tips of the front toes is allowable but is a fault. The black, long-haired variety is known as GROENENDAEL.
(ii) The dog should be either rich fawn to russet mahogany or distinctly grey, each with a black overlay. The coat is characteristically double pigmented, wherein the tip of each hair is blackened. On mature males, this blackening is especially pronounced on the shoulders, back, and rib section. The chest colour is a mixture of black and grey. The face has a black mask and the ears are mostly black. The underparts of the dog, tail, and breeches are light beige or grey. A small white patch is permitted on the chest but should not extend into the neck or breast. Frost on the chin or muzzle is normal. Too light a colour or too black a colour is a serious fault. This variety is known as the TERVUREN.
(b) Short-haired
The coat should be comparatively short and straight with a dense undercoat. It is very short on the head, the ears and lower legs. The hair is somewhat longer around the neck where it forms a collarette and on the tail and back of the thighs. The colour should be from a rich fawn to mahogany with a black overlay. There should be a black mask and black ears. The underparts of the body, tail, and breeches are lighter fawn. A small white patch on the chest is permissible as is white on the tips of the toes. A washed-out fawn colour is undesirable. This variety is known as the MALINOIS.

(c) Rough-haired
The coat should have a rough or dry texture and appear unkempt. The undercoat is thick and woolly. The coat is of medium length on all parts of the body except the head where the hair on the skull is short while the hair on the muzzle is slightly longer forming a beard or whiskers. The coat should be light fawn to red brown in colour. Grey is acceptable as well. Blackening may appear on the muzzle, ears, and tail. The underparts of the dog, tail, and breeches are light beige or grey. The tail should not form a plume. A small amount of white is permitted on the chest and the tips of the toes. This variety is known as the LAEKEN.

Head
Should be clean-cut and strong with size in proportion to the body. Skull should be flattened on top rather than rounded. The width should be approximately the same as, but not wider than the length. The stop should be moderate. Muzzle should be moderately pointed, avoiding any tendency to snipiness, and approximately equal in length to that of the top skull. Nose should be black without spots or discoloured areas. Mouth: the jaw should be strong and powerful. The lips should be tight and black with no pink showing on the outside. There should be a full complement of strong, white, evenly-set teeth. There should be either an even or a scissors bite. An overshot or undershot bite is a serious fault. Eyes should be dark brown, medium sized, slightly almond shaped and should not protrude. Ears should be triangular in shape, stiff, erect, and in proportion in size to the head. The base of the ear should not come below the centre of the eye.

Neck
Should be round and rather outstretched, tapered from head to body and well muscled with tight skin.

Body
Forequarters
Chest should be deep but not broad. The lowest point should reach the elbow of the front leg and should form a smooth ascending curve to the abdomen. Shoulder should be long and oblique, laid flat against the body and should form a sharp angle (approximately 90 degrees) with the upper arm. Legs should be straight, strong and parallel to each other. The bone should be oval rather than round. The length should be in proportion to the size of the dog. Pasterns should be of medium length and should be strong and very slightly sloped.

Back
Should be level, straight and firm from withers to hip. The withers should be slightly higher than and slope into the back.

Loin
The loin section viewed from above should be relatively short, broad, and strong, and should blend smoothly into the back. The abdomen should be moderately developed and should be neither tucked up nor paunchy.

Hindquarters
Croup should be medium long with a gradual slope. Thighs should be broad and heavily muscled. The upper and lower thigh bones form a relatively sharp angle at the stifle joint. Hocks: the angle at the hock is relatively sharp although the angulation is not extreme. Metatarsus should be of medium length, strong, and slightly sloped. Dewclaws, if any, should be removed.

Tail
Should be strong at the base and the bone should reach the hock. At rest, it should be held low and in action it should be raised with a slight curl which is strongest toward the tip. It should not curl over the dog?s back or form a hook.

Feet
The front feet should be round (cat-footed). The rear feet should be slightly elongated. Toes on both front and back feet should be curved and close together. They should be well padded. Nails should be strong and black except that they may be white to match white toe tips.

Gait
Should be smooth, free and easy, seemingly never tiring and exhibiting facility of movement rather than a hard driving action. He should single track on a fast gait - i.e., the legs, both front and rear, converge toward the centre line of the body. The backline should remain firm and level, parallel to the line of motion, with no crabbing. He should show a marked tendency to move in a circle rather than a straight line.

Faults
Any deviation from these specifications is a fault. In determining whether a fault is minor, serious, or major, these two factors should be used as a guide:
(a) The extent to which it deviates from the standard.
(b) The extent to which such deviation would actually affect the
working ability of the dog.

Disqualifications
(a) Viciousness.
(b) Excessive shyness.
(c) Any colour or colour combination not allowed in the standard.
(d) Ears hanging (as on a hound).
(e) Tail cropped or stump.
(f) Males under 23 inches (58 cm) or over 27 inches (69 cm) in height. Females under 21 inches (53 cm) or over 25 inches (64 cm) in height.

FCI Standard - Chien de Berger Belge

FCI-Standard No 15/ 19.04.2002 /GB

BELGIAN SHEPHERD DOG
(Chien de Berger Belge)

 

 

TRANSLATION: Mrs. Jeans-Brown, revised by Dr. R. Pollet.

ORIGIN: Belgium.

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF ORIGINAL VALID STANDARD: 22.06.2001.

UTILISATION: Originally a sheep dog, today a working dog (guarding, defence, tracking, etc.) and an all-purpose service dog, as well as a family dog.

CLASSIFICATION F.C.I.: Group 1 Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs
(except Swiss Cattle dogs).
Section 1 Sheepdogs.
With working trial.

BRIEF HISTORICAL SUMMARY: In Belgium, at the end of the 1800s, there were a great many herding dogs, whose type was varied and whose coats were extremely dissimilar. In order to rationalise this state of affairs, some enthusiastic dog fanciers formed a group and sought guidance from Prof. A. Reul of the Cureghem Veterinary Medical School, whom one must consider to have been the real pioneer and founder of the breed.
The breed was officially born between 1891 and 1897. On September 29th, 1891, the Belgian Shepherd Dog Club (Club du Chien de Berger Belge) was founded in Brussels and in the same year on November 15th in Cureghem, Professor A. Reul organised a gathering of 117 dogs, which allowed him to carry out a return and choose the best specimens. In the following years they began a real programme of selection, carrying out some very close interbreeding involving a few stud dogs.
By April 3rd, 1892, a first detailed breed standard had already been drawn up by the Belgian Shepherd Dog Club. One single breed was allowed, with three coat varieties. However, as was said at the time, the Belgian Shepherd only belonged to ordinary people and therefore the breed still lacked status.
As a result, it wasn't until 1901 that the first Belgian Shepherds were registered with the Royal Saint-Hubert Society Stud Book (L.O.S.H.).
During the following years, the prime movers among the Belgian Shepherd enthusiasts set to work with great determination to unify the type and correct the faults. It can be said that by 1910 the type and temperament of the Belgian Shepherd had been established.
During the history of the Belgian Shepherd, the question of differing but acceptable varieties and colours had led to many heated discussions. On the other hand, anything involving morphology, temperament and suitability for work has never caused any disagreement.

GENERAL APPEARANCE: The Belgian Shepherd is a mediolineal dog, harmoniously proportioned, combining elegance and power, of medium size, with dry, strong muscle, fitting into a square, rustic, used to the open air life and built to resist the frequent atmospheric variations of the Belgian climate.
Through the harmony of its shape and its high head-carriage, the Belgian Shepherd should give the impression of that elegant strength which has become the heritage of the selected representatives of a working breed. The Belgian Shepherd is to be judged in its natural stance, without physical contact with the handler.

IMPORTANT PROPORTIONS: The Belgian Shepherd dog can be fitted into a square. The chest is let down to the level of the elbows. The length of the muzzle is equal to or slightly longer than half the length of the head.

BEHAVIOUR / TEMPERAMENT: The Belgian Shepherd is a watchful and active dog, bursting with energy, and always ready to leap into action. As well as its innate skill at guarding flocks, it also possesses the highly prized qualities of the best guard dog of property. Without any hesitation it is the stubborn and keen protector of its owner. It brings together all those qualities necessary for a shepherd, guard, defence and service dog.
Its lively, alert temperament and its confident nature, showing no fear or aggressiveness, should be obvious in its body stance and the proud attentive expression in its sparkling eyes.
When judging this breed, one should take into consideration its calm and fearless temperament.

HEAD: Carried high, long without exaggeration, rectilinear, well chiselled and dry. Skull and muzzle are roughly equal in length, with at the most a very slight bias in favour of the muzzle which puts the finishing touch to the whole head.

CRANIAL REGION: Of medium width, in proportion with the length of the head, with a forehead flat rather than round, frontal groove not very pronounced; in profile, parallel to imaginary line extending muzzle line; occipital crest little developed; brow ridges and zygomatic arches not prominent.
Stop: Moderate.

FACIAL REGION:
Nose: Black.
Muzzle: Medium length and well chiselled under the eyes; narrowing gradually toward the nose, like an elongated wedge; bridge of the nose straight and parallel to the continuation of the topline of the forehead; mouth well split, which means that when the mouth is open the commissures of the lips are pulled right back, the jaws being well apart.
Lips: Thin, tight and strongly pigmented.
Jaws/teeth: Strong, white teeth, regularly and strongly set in well-developed jaws. Scissor bite; pincer bite, which is preferred by sheep and livestock herders, is tolerated. Complete dentition according to the dental formula; the absence of two premolars 1 (2 P1) is tolerated and the molars 3 (M3) are not taken into consideration.
Cheeks: dry and quite flat, although muscled.
Eyes: Medium size, neither protruding nor sunken, slightly almond-shaped, obliquely set, brownish colour, preferably dark; black rimmed eyelids; direct, lively, intelligent and enquiring look.
Ears: Rather small, set high, distinctly triangular appearance, well-rounded outer ear, pointed tips, stiff, carried upright and vertical when dog is alert.

NECK: Well standing out, slightly elongated, rather upright, well-muscled, broadening gradually towards the shoulders, without dewlap, nape slightly arched.

BODY: Powerful without being heavy; length from point of shoulder to point of buttock approximately equal to height at withers.
Topline: upper line of back and loins is straight.
Withers: Pronounced.
Back: firm, short and well-muscled.
Loins: Solid, short, sufficiently broad, well-muscled.
Croup: well-muscled ; only very slightly sloping ; sufficiently broad but not excessively so.
Chest: little broad, but well let down; upper part of ribs arched; seen from the front forechest little broad, but without being narrow.
Underline: Begins below the chest and rises gently in a harmonious curve towards the belly, which is neither drooping nor tucked up, but slightly raised and moderately developed.

TAIL: Well set on, strong at the base, of medium length, reaching at least to hock, but preferably further; at rest carried down, with tip curved backwards at level of hock; more raised when moving, although without passing the horizontal, the curve towards the tip becoming more accentuated, without ever at any time forming a hook or deviation.

LIMBS

FOREQUARTERS:
General view: Bone solid but not heavy; muscle dry and strong; front legs upright from all sides and perfectly parallel when seen from the front.
Shoulder: Shoulder blade long and oblique, well attached, forming a sufficient angle with the humerus, ideally measuring 110-115 degrees.
Upper arm: Long and sufficiently oblique.
Elbow: Firm, neither turning out nor tied in.
Forearm: Long and straight.
Wrist (carpus): very firm and clean.
Front pastern (metacarpus): Strong and short, as perpendicular to the ground as possible or only very slightly sloping forward.
Feet: Round, cat feet; toes arched and well closed; pads thick and springy; nails dark and strong.

 

HINDQUARTERS:
General view: Powerful, but not heavy; in profile hindlegs are upright and seen from behind perfectly parallel.
Upper thigh: Medium length, broad and strongly muscled.
Stifle: approximately on the plumb line from the hip; normal stifle angulation.
Lower thigh: Medium length, broad and muscled.
Hock: Close to the ground, broad and muscled, moderate angulation.
Back pastern (metatarsus): Solid and short; dewclaws not desirable.
Feet: may be light oval; toes arched and well closed; pads thick and springy; nails dark and strong.

 

GAIT / MOVEMENT: Lively and free movement at all gaits; the Belgian Shepherd is a good galloper but its normal gaits are the walk and especially the trot; limbs move parallel to the median plane of the body. At high speed the feet come nearer to the median plane; at the trot the reach is
medium, the movement even and easy, with good rear drive, and the topline remains tight while the front legs are not lifted too high. Always on the move, the Belgian Shepherd seems tireless; its gait is fast, springy and lively. It is capable of suddenly changing direction at full speed. Due to its exuberant character and its desire to guard and protect, it has a definite tendency to move in circles.

 

SKIN: Elastic but taut over all the body; edges of lips and eyelids strongly pigmented.

COATS AND VARIETIES: Since the coat varies in length, direction, appearance and colour among Belgian Shepherds, this particular point has been adopted as the criterion for distinguishing between the four varieties of the breed: the Groenendael, the Tervueren, the Malinois and the Laekenois.
These four varieties are judged separately and can each be awarded a C.A.C., a C.A.C.A.B. or a reserve title.

HAIR: In all the varieties the hair must always be dense, close-fitting and of good texture, with the woolly undercoat forming an excellent protective covering.

LONG HAIR: The hair is short on the head, the outer side of the ears and the lower part of the legs, except on the rear side of the forearm which is covered from elbow to wrist by long hairs called fringes. The hair is long and smooth on the rest of the body and longer and more abundant around the neck and on the forechest, where it forms a collarette or ruff and a jabot or apron. The opening of the ear is protected by thick tufts of hair. From the base of the ear the hair is upright and frames the head. The back of the thighs is covered with very long abundant hair forming the culottes or breeches. The tail is furnished with long, abundant hair forming a plume.

The Groenendael and the Tervueren are the long-haired.

SHORT HAIR: The hair is very short on the head, the outer sides of the ears and the lower part of the legs. It is short over the rest of the body and fuller at the tail and around the neck where it forms a collarette or ruff which begins at the base of the ear, stretching as far as the throat. As well, the back of the thighs is fringed with longer hair. The tail is ear of corn shaped, but does not form a plume.

The Malinois is the short-haired.

 

ROUGH HAIR: What especially characterises the rough hair variety is the roughness and dryness of the hair, which, moreover, is rasping and tousled. About 6 cm long over the whole body, the hair is shorter on the top of the muzzle, the forehead and the legs. The hair around the eyes and those furnishing the muzzle should not be so long as to disguise the shape of the head. However, it is essential to have furnishings on the muzzle. The tail should not form a plume.

The Laekenois is the rough-haired.

COLOUR:
Mask: For Tervueren and Malinois the mask must be very pronounced and tend to encompass the top and bottom lip, the corners of the lips and the eyelids in one single black zone. A strict minimum of six points of skin pigmentation is called for: the two ears, the two upper eyelids and the two lips, upper and lower, which must be black.
Black overlay: In Tervueren and Malinois, the black overlay means that the hairs have a black tip which shades the base colour. This blackening is in any case "flamed" and must not be present in great patches nor in real stripes (brindled). In the Laekenois the black shading is more discreetly expressed.

Groenendael: Only uniform black.

Tervueren: Only fawn with black overlay or grey with black overlay, with black mask; however, the fawn with black overlay is still preferred. The fawn must be rich, neither light nor washed-out. Any dog whose coat colour is anything but fawn with black overlay or does not match the desired intensity of colour cannot be considered an elite specimen.

Malinois: Only fawn with black overlay and with black mask.

 

Laekenois: Only fawn with traces of black overlay, mainly on the muzzle and the tail.

For all varieties: a small amount of white is tolerated on forechest and toes.

SIZE, WEIGHT AND MEASUREMENTS:
Height at withers:
The ideal weight at withers is on average - 62 cm for males
- 58 cm for females.
Limits: 2 cm less, 4 cm more.

 

Weight:
Males about 25-30 kg.
Females about 20-25 kg.

Measurements: Average normal measures for an adult male Belgian Shepherd of 62 cm at the withers:

Length of body (from point of shoulder to point of buttock): 62 cm.
Length of head: 25 cm.
Length of muzzle: 12,5 – 13 cm.

FAULTS: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

General appearance: Cloddy, lacking elegance; too light or too slender; longer than high; fitting into a rectangle.
Head: heavy, too strong, lacking parallelism, not sufficiently chiselled or dry; forehead too rounded; stop too accentuated or too flat; muzzle too short or pinched; Roman nose; brow ridges or zygomatic arches too prominent.
Nose, lips and eyelids: traces of depigmentation.
Dentition: badly aligned incisors. Serious fault: lack of one incisor (1 I), one premolar 2 (1 P2), one premolar 3 (1 P3) or three premolars 1 (3 P1).

Eyes: light, round.
Ears: large, long, too broad at the base, set low, carried outward or inward.

 

Neck: slender; short or deep set.
Body: too long; thoracic cage too broad (cylindrical).
Withers: flat, low.
Topline: back and/or loins long, weak, sagging or arched.
Croup: too sloping, overbuilt.
Underline: too much or too little let down; too much belly.
Tail: set too low; carried too high, forming a hook, deviated.
Limbs: bone too light or too heavy; bad upright stance in profile (e.g. front pasterns too sloping or weak wrists), from the front (feet turning in or out, out at elbow, etc.), or from behind (hindlegs too close, too wide apart or barrel shaped, hocks close or open, etc.); too little or exaggeratedly angulated.
Feet: spreading.
Gait: moving close, too short a stride, too little drive, poor back transmission, high stepping action.

 

 

Coat: all four varieties: insufficient undercoat.

Groenendael and Tervueren: woolly, wavy, curly hair; hair not long enough.
Malinois: hair half-long where it should be short; smooth-haired; harsh hairs scattered in the short coat; wavy coat.
Laekenois: hair too long, silky, wavy, crisp-haired or short; filled with fine hairs scattered in tufts in the rough hair; hairs too long around the eye or the lower end of the head (the chin); bushy tail.

Colour: for all four varieties: white marking on chest forming tie; white on the feet going beyond toes.

Groenendael: reddish tinges in the coat; grey breeches.
Tervueren: grey.
Tervuren and Malinois: brindle; tints not warm enough; not enough or too much black overlay or set in patches over the body; not enough mask.
Tervueren, Malinois and Laekenois: too light a fawn; a base
colour which is very diluted, named washed-out, is considered a serious fault.

Temperament: specimens lacking in self-confidence or overly nervous.

 

 

DISQUALIFYING FAULTS:

Temperament: aggressive or timid specimens.

General appearance: lack of breed type.
Dentition: overshot; undershot, even if contact is not lost (reverse scissor bite); crossbite; absence of one canine (1 C), one upper carnassial (1 P4) or lower carnassial (1 M1), one molar (1 M1 -upper jaw- or 1 M2; M3 are not taken into account), one premolar 3 (1 P3) plus one other tooth or a total of three teeth (excluding the premolars 1) or more.

 

Nose, lips, eyelids: strong depigmentation.
Ears: drooping or artificially kept erect.
Tail: missing or shortened, at birth or by docking; carried too high and ringed or curled.
Coat: lack of undercoat.
Colour: any colours which do not correspond with those of the described varieties; too widespread white markings on forechest, especially if they reach as far as the neck; white on feet going more than halfway up the front or the back pasterns and forming socks; white markings anywhere other than forechest and toes; lack of mask, including a muzzle of lighter colour than the rest of the coat in Tervueren and Malinois.
Size: outside the limits laid down.

 

Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified.

N.B.: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

CROSSBREEDING – MATINGS BETWEEN VARIETIES:
Any matings between varieties are forbidden, except in exceptional circumstances, when this ban can be lifted by the appropriate and official breed councils (Text 1974, drawn up in Paris).

 

 

 

akc ukc herding protection agility obedience tracking conformation belgian tervuren dog breeder for shepherd dog dogs puppy or puppies
There are four closely related breeds of Belgian Shepherd collectively referred to as 'Chien de Berger Belge', which were classified as independent breeds in 1891. All are herding and guard dogs, and are primarily distinguished by their appearances: the Malinois has short hair, the Laekenois (not currently recognized by the American Kennel Club) has wiry hair, the Groenendael (also known simply as the 'Belgian Shepherd') has long, black hair, and the Tervuren has long hair of any other color. The Tervuren was named after the Belgian city of Tervuren where it was developed. It was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1918, but nearly went extinct before World War II. Recently, it has enjoyed moderate popularity as a versatile breed and excellent herder. Size: The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd has a shoulder height of 58-64 cm (23-25 in) and weighs 18-34 kg (40-75 lbs). It has a flat skull, almond shaped eyes, a moderate stop (point at which the muzzle meets the forehead) and triangular, erect ears. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds have a flat back, curved tail, and small, round 'cat feet'. They are muscular and lithe with square-proportioned bodies. Coat: The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd has a long, thick double coat, which comes in brown with possible black overlay (which may darken with age) and a black mask. Chest and toes may contain small patches of white. The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd may also be sable or grey, but this is penalized in the show ring in some countries. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds shed heavily once or twice a year. Character: The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd is energetic, lively and eager to work. It is bred for intelligence and awareness of its surroundings. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds require frequent face time and playtime with their master. They tend to bond very strongly with one person. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds can develop phobias of certain objects or locations as puppies, but usually grow out of it by adulthood. Temperament: The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd should be socialized as a puppy if it is to live with other dogs or pets. It is shy around strangers, but gets along well with children. It has high socialization and activity requirements, making it less than ideal for those unwilling or unable to invest significant time. Care: Belgian Tervuren Shepherds require brushing and combing twice weekly, more often when shedding. Excessive brushing or combing can damage the undercoat. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds have a long life span of 11-13 years. Belgian Shepherds have similar health problems as other breeds, but are particularly susceptible to epileptic seizures, especially the Tervuren. Training: The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd should be trained gently, but with determination. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds are highly adverse to harsh treatment; hitting or yelling at them will only have negative effects. Best results are achieved through awards-based training methods. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds require mental stimulation, so training should not be overly repetitive. Obedience and sport-specific training (such as tracking or dog agility) will reap great benefits and allow the Belgian Tervuren Shepherd to realize its full potential. Activity: The Belgian Tervuren Shepherd needs a sufficient amount of outdoor exercise every day, including a long jog or walk and active playtime in the yard. Belgian Tervuren Shepherds thrive on mental stimulation, and will enjoy a complex game or sports training session even more than a simple round of catch. Belgian Tervuren Shepherd Puppies for Sale Belgian Tervuren Shepherd Puppies for Sale Belgian Tervuren Shepherd Puppies for Sale - Shipped Worldwide! Finding the right Belgian Tervuren Shepherd puppy can be dog gone hard work. 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Start Your Search for the Perfect Belgian Tervuren Shepherd Puppy Popular Dog Breeds Akita, American Pit Bull Terrier, Australian Shepherd, Basset Hound, Beagle, Bichon Frise, Boston Terrier, Boxer, Brittany, Cairn Terrier, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Chihuahua, Chinese Shar-Pei, Cocker Spaniel, Collie, Dachshund, Doberman Pinscher, English Bulldog, English Springer Spaniel, German Shepherd Dog, German Shorthaired Pointer, Golden Retriever, Great Dane, Havanese, Jack Russell Terrier, Labrador Retriever, Lhasa Apso, Maltese, Mastiff, Miniature Pinscher, Miniature Schnauzer, Papillon, Pekingese, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Pomeranian, Pug, Rottweiler, Saint Bernard, Shetland Sheepdog, Shih Tzu, Siberian Husky, Standard Poodle, Weimaraner, West Highland White Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, more dog The Belgian Tervuren has a square shaped appearance to its body. When viewed from the side, the topline of its moderately pointed muzzle is parallel to the topline of its skull. The stop is moderate. The black lips are tight. The medium sized, almond-shaped eyes are dark brown. The erect ears are triangular in shape with their height equal to their width. The chest is deep reaching the elbows. The legs are straight, parallel and vertical to the ground. The topline is level, sloping slightly at the withers. Dewclaws are usually removed. The feet are cat-like in shape. The teeth meet in a scissors or level bite. The tail is strong at the base with the bone reaching to the hock. The double coat is weather resistant with long, abundant, close-fitting guard hairs. The overall length of the harsh coat is medium to long with the hair on the head, legs and outer surface of the ears being shorter. The undercoat is dense and the outer coat is straight with black tips. Males have a mane of hair around the neck that is not as prominent in females. There is longer hair fringing down the back and front legs with abundant hair on the tail. Coat colors include rich fawn to russet mahogany, or shades of gray with black tips. The chest, toes and chin may have some white. The coat usually darkens as the dog gets older. Temperament The Belgian Tervuren is one of four Belgian sheepdogs. A very bright and obedient dog, it is determined and observant with strong protective and territorial instincts. Socialize well to prevent it from becoming shy or sensitive. Belgian Tervurens need an experienced master who is firm, but not heavy handed. If you are harsh or overbearing it will become uncooperative. Owners need to display a confident, natural authority over the dog. Consistent rules must be set and made clear. This breed is instinctively protective so it should be trained and socialized very well from an early age. Puppies should be socialized right from birth. Good for working and competition obedience, these dogs make excellent police and guard dogs. This type of work is currently their main occupation. They do however, make excellent pets if they have owners who can challenge their minds with an air of leadership. They are ever watchful, alert and loyal. The Belgian Tervuren is good with children if socialized well with them. This breed needs to be part of the family and not locked up in a kennel. They need leadership, daily exercise along with training and companionship, for without it they may become destructive and hard to handle. The Belgian Tervuren is high energy, with a high mental capacity, and is quick to comprehend. They need a job to do, especially if you are dealing with working lines. Take care when introducing this dog with small non-canine pets. They can be rather dominant toward other dogs and need an owner who can communicate to the dog that dominance is an unwanted behavior. Provided they are correctly socialized with cats and other pets, they should not present any problems. Belgian Tervurens may instinctively display herding behavior such as chasing and circling, moving effortlessly for hours and nipping at people's heels. They must be taught not to do this to people. This is a very demanding dog. It needs an experienced owner for it can easily be difficult to control unless the owner knows how to handle him. The way the owner handles the dog can produce wide differences in temperament and aggressiveness. Talk to someone experienced with the breed before you buy your dog. These dogs are often impressive; don't base your purchase solely on achievement records and appearances. Only adopt this type of dog if you fully understand what it means to be alpha. Height, Weight Height: Males 24 - 26 inches (61 - 66 cm) Females 22 - 24 inches (56 - 61 cm) Weight: Males 65 - 75 pounds (29 - 34 kg) Females 60 - 70 pounds (27 - 32 kg) Health Problems This hardy, healthy breed has no major health concerns. Some minor concerns that have been seen are epilepsy, skin allergies, eye problems, excessive shyness, excessive aggressiveness and occasionally hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. Do not overfeed this breed, for it has a tendency to become obese and lazy. Living Conditions The Belgian Tervuren will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This breed prefers cool climates, but adapts well to others. It can live outdoors but would much rather be with his people. Exercise This is a working dog that is accustomed to an active outdoor life. As such it needs a lot of exercise, including a long daily walk. In addition, it will greatly benefit being off the leash as much as possible in a safe area. Life Expectancy About 12-14 years Litter Size Average 6 - 10 puppies Grooming The Belgian Tervuren has a long, straight, medium-length, heavy outer coat and a dense undercoat that requires daily combing and brushing. Clip out mats that form, particularly in the ruff and on the legs, and clip hair from between the toes and on the outer ears. This breed is a constant light shedder, with males shedding heavily once a year and females twice a year. The coat needs a good thorough brushing once or twice a week. Origin The Belgian Tervuren was named for the Belgian village of Tervuren. It is one of the four varieties of the Belgian sheepdogs, the Belgian Tervuren, Belgian Groenendael, Belgian Malinois and the less popular Belgian Laekenois, which all share a common foundation. In most countries and breed clubs all four dogs are considered the same breed with different varieties in coat types. All four dogs share a breed standard in all countries except for the AKC, which since 1959 recognizes them as separate breeds and does not recognize one of the four (the Laekenois), whereas the UKC, which is also a U.S. registry does recognize all four varieties as one breed. Versatile and highly intelligent, all four varieties of the Belgian sheepdog excel at a variety of talents, including but not limited to, police work such as narcotics and bomb detection, protection and Schutzhund, search and rescue, also obedience, agility, tracking, herding, sled and cart pulling and as a guide for the blind and assistant to the disabled. These high energy, extremely intelligent dogs need leadership, to be challenged, and well exercised daily and therefore are not for everyone, but can make an excellent family companion with the right owners. The Belgian Malinois was the first of the four sheepdogs to establish type. Until the other four were established in type they were called "Berger Belge a poil court autre que Malinois," which means "Belgian short-coated Sheepdog who is not the Malinois." Today all four sheepdogs are popular in Belgium, with the Laekenois and Malinois more often used as working type dogs than the Belgian Groenendael and Tervuren but all types still making excellent workers. Group Herding, AKC Herding Recognition ABTC, CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR, DRA, NAPR breed